• Laws
  • News

Voting Rights Challenged - Latest Race Discrimination In Alabama

601Shares
17.1KViews

It appears that in its October 4 hearing of the arguments about Alabama redistricting cases which impacts voting rights, the Supreme Court favors the state in its recent actions.

The nearly two-hour long hearing involved the electoral map created by the Republican party that tends to diminish the voting power of Black voters, reported Reuters.

In defense of his fellow Republicans, Alabama Solicitor General Edmund LaCour, Jr. upheld the decision of the party. Three federal judges, namely, Ketanji Brown Jackson, Elena Kagan, and Sonia Sotomayor, grilled him in court.

All three female justices - Jackson, the 116th justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and the first black woman to be sworn in as one - are liberals.

The conservative justices who attended the hearing, according to the report, leaned toward some of the arguments presented by LaCour.

COPYRIGHT_LNN: Published on https://www.lawnewsnetwork.com/voting-rights/ by - on 2022-10-10T10:12:34.228Z

As the aforementioned electoral map affects their voting rights, the Black voters sought to know whether it’s legal or not. For them, the redistricting appeared to be discriminatory.

Twenty-seven percent of the population of Alabama are composed of registered Black voters.

The Republican’s electoral map shows that the party placed a huge chunk of the Black voters in one district. As for the remaining ones, the republicans scattered them across different districts.

This kind of redistricting that happened will cause the influence of the Black voters to wane.

Jackson, Kagan, and Sotomayor as well as the Black voters themselves deemed these actions as contradictory to what the Voting Rights Act of 1965 stands for.

If the voting rights of the Black voters is at stake, how will the Supreme Court further proceed with this legal matter?

Alabama challenge to Voting Rights Act heard by Supreme Court

Alabama’s Brewing Race Discrimination?

America’s 1965 Voting Rights Act basically aims to safeguard voting rights. It likewise intends to protect Black voters from racial discrimination.

However, Ketanji Brown Jackson and her two fellow justices alleged that the redistricting conducted by the Republicans challenges the fundamental purpose of the said voting law.

According to TV network Al Jazeera, Edmund LaCour, Jr. clarified that the Republicans did not violate any law when they created the electoral map.

During the hearing, he said that the process was done “in a lawful [and] race-neutral manner.”

LaCour also explained to the Supreme Court justices what Jackson, Kagan, and Sotomayor were trying to get at, saying:

They argued that Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act requires Alabama to replace its map with a racially gerrymandered plan maximizing the number of majority-minority districts.

- Edmund Gerard LaCour, Jr., Solicitor General, Attorney General’s Office, Alabama

For Associate Justice Amy Coney Barrett, a conservative, the electoral map created does not automatically mean the Republicans or the state of Alabama planned to discriminate Black voters.

Setting aside the allegations of voting rights violation, Barret said that she perceived the redistricting cases as something that tackle “equal opportunity.”

A Black man and an Asian American woman both wearing a face mask cast their votes
A Black man and an Asian American woman both wearing a face mask cast their votes

Gerry The Salamander

To explain the term used by Edmund LaCour, Jr. here’s a quick detour from the voting rights issue.

In the U.S., per Encyclopedia Britannica, gerrymandering is a political practice considered unfair and undemocratic.

Political or partisan gerrymandering is a way for one party to use electoral district boundaries to gain advantage over other parties.

Racial gerrymandering is all about reducing the voting power of minority groups. This one is what’s happening in Alabama, upsetting the voting rights of its Black voters.

American author Richard Alsop (1761-1815) coined the term “The Gerry-mander,” according to Smithsonian magazine, based on an illustration by American cartoonist Elkanah Tisdale (1768-1835).

In 1812, when he was still the governor of Massachusetts, Elbridge Gerry (1744-1814), the fifth U.S. vice president (1813-1814), implemented a law about state senatorial districts.

One district had an outline that nearly resembled a mythical winged salamander.

A black-and-white senatorial district outline drawing, with a winged salamander on the right portion
A black-and-white senatorial district outline drawing, with a winged salamander on the right portion

The U.S. Voting Rights Act Of 1965

What a way to celebrate the ongoing National Voter Education Week in the U.S.!

The news of the voting rights of the Black people in Alabama seemingly getting trampled on makes the celebration not only timely but more significant than ever before.

President Lyndon Johnson (1908-1973) signed into law the Voting Rights Act (1965) on August 6, 1965, to ban previous voting practices that tend to discriminate.

Now in its 57th year, this voting law becomes embroiled in a legal battle in Alabama.

The state faces accusations of denting the Voting Rights Act and squashing the Black people’s voting power as it introduced the electoral map in question.

A Black woman casts her vote in Cardozo High School in Washington, D.C. in 1964
A Black woman casts her vote in Cardozo High School in Washington, D.C. in 1964

Black Voters Matter

In the name of fairness and equality, Black votes should count. That’s what Associate Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson ensures to be put into action through the upholding of the voting rights.

Jackson questions the impartiality in Alabama’s redirection cases.

That’s what the nonprofit Brennan Center for Justice (est. 1995) at New York University School of Law generally warns about redistricting:

The redistricting process remains all too vulnerable to racial discrimination and partisan manipulation.

- Brennan Center for Justice, New York University School of Law

Black protesters in Washington in 1963 carrying placards with the words ‘we demand voting rights now’
Black protesters in Washington in 1963 carrying placards with the words ‘we demand voting rights now’

According to the Associated Press, Associate Justice Elena Kagan pointed something out to Solicitor General Edmund LaCour, Jr.

At the hearing, she made him realize that he and his party are trying to somehow make them, the Black voters, fine-tune the Voting Rights Act of 1965 to suit their interest.

What would be left of that law if Republicans like him pushed hard their redirection on them, asked Kagan.

In the end, the voting rights of the Black people along with the white citizens of the U.S. must be the same.

Share: Twitter | Facebook | Linkedin

Recent Articles

  • Knee Replacement Lawsuit Statute Of Limitations - Claims And Settlements

    Laws

    Knee Replacement Lawsuit Statute Of Limitations - Claims And Settlements

    If you are interested to know more about knee replacement lawsuit statute of limitations, then you are in the right place. According to knee replacement lawsuits, the devices loosened and became unstable, necessitating revision surgery to correct the issues. Knee implants named in lawsuits include Depuy Attune, Zimmer NexGen, and Arthrex iBalance. Sulzer Medica paid $1 billion to settle 4,000 hip and knee implant cases in the largest knee replacement lawsuit settlement.

  • Risperdal Lawsuit Update 2022 - Response To Alleged Risperdal Harm

    News

    Risperdal Lawsuit Update 2022 - Response To Alleged Risperdal Harm

    We already have the Risperdal lawsuit update 2022. Thousands of men and their families across the United States began filing lawsuits in response to alleged Risperdal harm. The plaintiffs claim they were not adequately warned that taking the medication could result in a noticeable increase in breast tissue (called gynecomastia). Risperdal has been linked to an increased risk of developing excess breast tissue, according to research. Those who have filed lawsuits claim they were not given any prior notice.

  • Bard Hernia Mesh Lawsuit Update 2022 - The Lawsuit Against C.R. Bard

    News

    Bard Hernia Mesh Lawsuit Update 2022 - The Lawsuit Against C.R. Bard

    People are interested regarding the Bard Hernia Mesh lawsuit update 2022. C.R. Bard is defending over 16,000 hernia mesh lawsuits alleging that its mesh devices were defective and caused thousands of hernia surgery patients to suffer injuries and complications. Hernia mesh attorneys handle claims in all 50 states. This post will provide news and updates on the C.R. Bard hernia mesh lawsuit, as well as an update on the current status of the Bard hernia mesh class-action MDL as of September 26, 2022, following the new $4.8 million C.R. Bard verdict in Rhode Island state court.

  • Rhode Island Hernia Mesh Bellwether Lawsuit - Jury Awarded $4.8M

    News

    Rhode Island Hernia Mesh Bellwether Lawsuit - Jury Awarded $4.8M

    On Monday, a jury in a state court in Rhode Island reached a verdict in the amount of $4.8 million dollars about the Rhode Island hernia mesh bellwether lawsuit. This is the first state court trial in the country involving allegedly defective hernia mesh implants. The trial took place in Rhode Island. Plaintiff Paul Trevino's attorney, Jonathan Orent of Motley Rice LLC, told Courtroom View Network that the jury awarded him $4.8 million, which he claims will increase to $7.68 million with interest.

  • Top 5 Free Law Internships For High School Students

    Laws

    Top 5 Free Law Internships For High School Students

    Participating in high school law internships and other programs with a legal focus will help you get ready for your future job if you're a high school student interested in becoming a lawyer. You can experience legal careers before you even enroll in college thanks to law internships for high school students, summer programs, and volunteer opportunities.

  • Brazilian Civil Code And Obligation Of In Laws Towards Elderly People

    Laws

    Brazilian Civil Code And Obligation Of In Laws Towards Elderly People

    According to the Brazilian civil code and obligation of in laws towards elderly, the elderly must not face any form of prejudice, and their offspring must take care of them as they get older. The "Estatuto do Idoso" (Elderly Statute) and the "Polictica Nacional de Sade do Idoso" are the two protection systems in place in Brazil (National Health Policy for the Elderly). Seniors have the following rights:

  • United States V. Microsoft - What Happened To The Case?

    Laws

    United States V. Microsoft - What Happened To The Case?

    Whether the Stored Communications Act lets warrants be issued for personal information that is stored outside of the U.S. United States v. Microsoft is a case that was heard by the U.S. Supreme Court in October 2017. On February 27, 2018, there was a hearing about the case.

  • Federal Weed Law - For Medical Purposes Only

    Laws

    Federal Weed Law - For Medical Purposes Only

    To date (2022 April), 18 states have legalized marijuana for recreational use, while another 37 allow its usage for medical purposes. When it came to legalizing medical marijuana, California was the trailblazer in 1996. Federal Weed still makes possession of any amount of marijuana a crime.

  • Antitrust - America’s Efforts To Smash Anticompetitive Practices

    News

    Antitrust - America’s Efforts To Smash Anticompetitive Practices

    One of the many ways the U.S. government ensures that business competition will thrive - and in a fair way - in the country is to enforce its antitrust laws. It already lost one fight too many against monopolies and unfair and unlawful business practices. However, the government also triumphed several times, and shall continue the battle.

  • Trump Asks U.S. Supreme Court To Intervene Over Seized Classified Documents

  • Law News Network - Providing Latest News About The Law

  • 180 Tips - Earn Money Using Free And Accurate Football Predictions

  • Climate Change Battle - A Promising Environmental Bill Gets Crushed

  • United States Supreme Court Continues Audio Live Stream Of Arguments